Current Events

Kevin D. Hoover, Duke University, "Karl Brunner’s Philosophy of Science: Macroeconomics through the Lens of Logical Empiricism"

Kevin D. Hoover, Duke University, "Karl Brunner’s Philosophy of Science: Macroeconomics through the Lens of Logical Empiricism"
Lunch
Friday, September 20, 2019
12:00 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Best known as a monetary economist and prominent proponent of monetarism, Karl Brunner was deeply knowledgeable about the philosophy of science and attempted to explicitly integrate logical empiricist thinking, derived in some measure from his engagement with the work of the philosopher Hans Reichenbach, into his economics.  His philosophical commitments are clearly reflected in this empirical work on monetary economics, his monetarist analysis, and in his critical approach to econometrics, microfoundations, and the New Classical macroeconomics.

Evelyn Forget, University of Manitoba

Evelyn Forget, University of Manitoba
Workshop
Friday, September 27, 2019
3:30 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Roel Visser, Bielefeld University and HOPE Center Fellow

Roel Visser, Bielefeld University and HOPE Center Fellow
Lunch
Friday, September 27, 2019
12:00 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Nathalie Sigot, University of Paris and HOPE Center Fellow

Nathalie Sigot, University of Paris and HOPE Center Fellow
Lunch
Friday, October 4, 2019
12:00 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Sandra Peart, University of Richmond

Sandra Peart, University of Richmond
Workshop
Friday, October 11, 2019
3:30 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

E. Roy Weintraub, Duke University

E. Roy Weintraub, Duke University
Lunch
Friday, October 11, 2019
12:00 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, New York University: Hayek Lecture

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, New York University: Hayek Lecture
Public Lecture
Thursday, October 17, 2019
4:45 pm
Location: 139 Social Sciences

In this lecture, Professor Bueno de Mesquita will question the impact of the Protestant Reformation, arguing that it was not a major driver either of northern Europe's economic success or of the decline of Roman Catholicism's sway in Europe. Rather, both, along with Europe's secularization and creation of sovereign states, were predictable products of the Concordat of Worms (1122).

Maria Pia Paganelli, Trinity University

Maria Pia Paganelli, Trinity University
Workshop
Friday, October 25, 2019
3:30 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Francois Claveau, University of Sherbrooke

Francois Claveau, University of Sherbrooke
Workshop
Friday, November 8, 2019
3:30 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

Jim Wible, University of New Hampshire

Jim Wible, University of New Hampshire
Workshop
Friday, November 15, 2019
3:30 PM
Location: 327 Social Sciences

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