Faculty Bios

Bruce Caldwell is a Research Professor of Economics and the Director of the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University. He is the author of Beyond Positivism: Economic Methodology in the 20th Century (1982), of Hayek's Challenge: An Intellectual Biography of F. A. Hayek (2004), and since 2002 has served as the General Editor of The Collected Works of F. A. Hayek, a multi-volume collection of Hayek’s writings. A past president of the History of Economics Society and of the Southern Economic Association, he is currently working on a family-authorized  biography of Hayek. When he's not working on Hayek, he doesn't know what to do, but sometimes he fills his time with tennis and golf. 
Steve G. Medema is University Distinguished Professor of Economics, President's Teaching Scholar, and the Director of the University Honors and Leadership Program at the University of Colorado Denver. He received his B.A. from Calvin College and his PhD from Michigan State University. Dr. Medema is the author of numerous scholarly books and articles, including The Hesitant Hand: Taming Self-Interest in the History of Economic Ideas (Princeton, 2009) and Economics and the Law: From Posner to Post Modernism and Beyond (Princeton, 2006). He served as Editor of the Journal of the History of Economic Thought from 1999-2008 and as President of the History of Economics Society in 2009-10. Dr. Medema's current research project explores the history of the use of the Coase theorem in economics, law and beyond.
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Jason Brent attended the very first HOPE Summer Institute in Denver, CO, during the summer of 2011. He is currently a fellow at the HOPE Center and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Duke University, teaching in the economics department, the Fuqua School of Business, and the Sanford School of Public Policy. In addition to teaching the survey course in the history of economics at Duke for the past four years, Jason has taught courses across the university on economic reasoning that integrate models from the history of economics with contemporary analysis and issues. These courses have been designed to bridge the gap between modern technical economics and the historic models and ideas that still often dominate discussions in the worlds of policy and business. As part of an ongoing project, in the spring of 2019 he introduced a new course for Duke undergraduates on economic analyses of the wealthy, again combining writings by Aquinas, Smith, Malthus, Marx, Veblen, and others with contemporary thinkers to look at how economists think – and have thought – about determinants of income and wealth, inequality, investment, and consumption among the very rich.